NASCAR Heat Racing League Rules

Welcome to the league rules page. The rules govern the NASCAR Heat Racing League and ensure fair and fun competition. League members, substitute drivers, and guest participants are required to read and understand the guidelines on this page. When a competitor violates the rules, the league administrators may assess penalties as well as other enforcements as necessary. If you're ever confused about something in the rules, then always feel free to contact the administrators or post a question in the forum.

The NASCAR Heat Racing League seeks to promote a positive environment, good sportsmanship, and close competition. We will not hesitate to remove a disruptive or disrespectful person from the league. As a result, everyone should think twice before acting out their frustrations or insulting any other competitors. Ultimately, the league administrators are just looking to assemble a quality group of NASCAR Heat racers. If this objective sounds unnreasonable, then one should not participate in our league.

I. General League Rules

A. Follow-Up Reviews

I-A 1. The league administrators always strive to apply the rules fairly and consistently. Leniency is our preferred policy. However, if you believe that we've made a mistake, then you can request a follow-up review for a penalty. To do so, please send us a private message on the forum within one week (or close to a week) after the appropriate race results have been posted on the website.

I-A 2. In your request for a follow-up review, you should be prepared to provide the following information: 1) an explanation about what happened, 2) a counter-argument derived specifically from the rules, and 3) the race replay file (if we request it). If these requirements are satisfied, then the administrators will consider your reasoning and come to a prompt secondary decision.

B. Installation Requirements

I-B 1. Each competitor must install the appropriate patches, courses, and mods for NASCAR Heat. A racer will be unable to connect to the league server without installing the 1.1e and 1.80 patches. For convenience, we also recommend installing the optional no-cd patch. The league administrators may prohibit drivers with game errors or installation problems from competing in any given event.

I-B 2. From time to time, the league hosts events on addon tracks which are not included in the original installation of NASCAR Heat. A competitor should review the appropriate series schedule page to determine which courses must be downloaded for the season. If you're searching for an addon track, then we would highly recommend checking out the The Mod Squad's Tracklist.

C. Custom Paint Schemes

I-C 1. Members of the NASCAR Heat Racing League are allowed to use custom paint schemes during events. Each league member can upload up to three vehicles per series. You can swap or update your custom paint schemes, but you cannot exceed three at any given moment in time. Substitute drivers, similarly, are also permitted to use them provided that they belong to the regular driver.

I-C 2. After developing a custom paint scheme, a league member is required to upload the corresponding tex file to the website before using the vehicle during an event. Any racer who ignores this rule will automatically forfeit 5 points in the championship standings. Please contact the administrators if you need us to create new account for you in order to access our driver login system.

D. Miscallaneous Rules

I-D 1. Prior to a race, the league administrators may announce special guidelines or procedures as necessary. At a road course, for example, the administrators might decide to implement a pace lap to avoid problems with the starting grid. Racers who violate these ad-hoc rules will be subject to league discipline. We recommend regularly visiting the forum and paying attention in the server.

I-D 2. The NASCAR Heat Racing League does not restart events for accidents. Racers who crash and then demand a restart can expect penalties. However, drivers may request restarts for obvious problems with the starting grid: alignment, pace speed, and damage issues are usually legitimate restart requests. Please inform us about issues immediately; do not wait until the race is underway.

II. Server Information

A. League Server

II-A 1. You can find the IP address for the league server in the Server Information section of the forum. Occasionally, such as when the server has an unexpected problem, the administrators may post alternative IP addresses on the forum for races and practices.

II-A 3. Before entering the league server, every competitor should select "ISDN" on the NASCAR Heat multiplayer screen. The server performs best when each racer has selected this connection option. Please make it a habit, although we'll occasionally remind you.

II-A 4. The NASCAR Heat Racing League also has a Ventrilo server. All competitors are required to log into it for races. Microphones are recommended but not required. You can find the details for the Ventrilo server in the Server Information section of the forum.

B. Race Requirements

II-B 1. Some basic standards exist for the size of NASCAR Heat Racing League fields. A minimum of 5 drivers must be scored or on the starting grid of a race for us to consider it as an official event in the championship standings. Substitute drivers do not count towards this requirement. If the minimum number of drivers is not satisfied, then we will either reschedule or cancel the event.

II-B 2. If the server crashes prior to the midpoint of a race, then the league will not consider the event to be official and will either reschedule or cancel it. However, if the race is more than 50% complete, then the league will count the event, with finishing positions determined through a "freeze frame" when the leader crosses the finish line on the final complete lap before the crash.

II-B 3. If more than half of the field disconnects from the server during a race, then the league will not consider it to be official and will either reschedule or cancel it. The rule just applies to disconnects; over half of the field can fail to finish an event due to more common problems like crashes, withdrawals, engine failures, running out of fuel, and steering wheel and pedal malfunctions.

C. Server Connection

II-C 1. The league usually hosts practices prior to every race. During this time, drivers can test their setups, assess their internet connections, and ask the administrators questions about the rules. If racers experience any trouble in their preparation, then the administrators may prohibit them from competing in the event. The league will score such drivers at back of the field in the race results.

In order to test computer, internet, or other settings, we suggest visiting: PC Pitstop.
You may need to restart your system if it is not functioning properly.

II-C 2. The NASCAR Heat Racing League is not responsible for dropped connections. A competitor who is disconnected from the server during a race should not return and argue with the administrators. Strange things often happen; sometimes drivers are disconnected without apparent cause. More often than not, however, the individual's internet connection, and not the league server, is the culprit.

III. Behavior and Conduct

A. Sportsmanship

III-A 1. You should not direct foul language or disparaging remarks at other competitors in the NASCAR Heat Racing League. We expect league members, substitute drivers, and other participants to demonstrate respect towards one another in the server, on the forum, and elsewhere. For additional guidance, please review our supplemental guidelines about expected behavior and conduct.

III-A 2. The league administrators should be notified about conflicts that develop between competitors. We do not accept excuses for revenge and payback incidents that find their way to the race track. Everyone should evaluate whether intentional contact is worth the typically serious consequences. Penalties can involve point deductions, suspensions, and even season-long bans.

III-A 3. The NASCAR Heat Racing League does not look well upon the "heat of the moment" excuse for prohibited conduct or intentional contact directed at other competitors. The league administrators will not consider this reasoning when determining penalties for these infractions. A league event should never descend into a firestorm of chaos and disrespect.

III-A 4. Competitors should minimize unneeded disturbances during league events. Do not start arguments or write commentaries through the NASCAR Heat chat interface. You should always discuss your problems in private with the league administrators. Drivers who cause pointless disruptions before, during, or after races will be subject to league discipline.

B. Cheating

III-B 1. The NASCAR Heat Racing League does not tolerate cheating. What is our definition of cheating? We consider cheating to be editing NASCAR Heat in order to gain a competitive advantage. However, certain files in the game may be modified for fun, such as menu screens, spotter sounds, and tire colors. These modifications are acceptable because they do not alter the core physics of the game.

III-B 2. The league administrators possess reliable tools to detect cheaters. Drivers with modified car and track files, for example, are identified with a streaming cheating message in the league server: "player X may be cheating." If this message appears, then the administrators may prohibit the driver in question from participating in a league race.

III-B 3. Once in awhile, cheating messages appear due to innocent installation problems. If you're concerned about your NASCAR Heat installation, then you should come to the server ahead of time and test whether this message appears.

III-B 4. Drivers caught cheating are banned from the NASCAR Heat Racing League. The league administrators will permit secondary reviews for cheating bans, but do not expect the outcome to change if the facts remain obvious.

C. Racing Tactics

III-C 1. Every competitor should recognize that cars are traveling at different speeds. A driver must use caution and patience when encountering traffic on the race track. The race leader, for example, should be willing to cruise behind a lapped car before forcing a dangerous passing maneuver, enabling the slower driver to see the faster car and make the appropriate adjustments. The league administrators may assess penalties when drivers are overly aggressive or initiate unnecessary contact.

III-C 2. Lapped drivers may compete with and pass the leaders. However, a slower car may not block faster cars lap after lap without moving aside in appropriate time. Both frontrunners and backmarkers should be courteous and recognize their surroundings, demonstrating "heads up driving." An aggressive, impatient driver who slams cars out of the way without allowing them to move can expect dangerous driving penalties. At the same time, a backmarker who drives dangerously or causes pointless accidents while attempting to block faster cars can also expect league discipline.

III-C 3. Deliberate blocking or contact between cars is prohibited. Drivers may still "trade paint" while competing in close battles for position, but the contact should never become retaliatory. Drivers may protect a position, but may not cause damage to faster cars attempting to make reasonable passes. Undoubtedly, blocking can be a complicated situation in which fault is ambiguous. As a general rule, once cars are alongside one another (fenders overlapping relative to the track surface), the leading driver no longer has an opportunity to protect a position. Protecting a position and instigating a dangerous block are two different things.

III-C 4. On road courses, drivers are required to keep at least two tires completely on the racing surface. The checkered rumble strips bordering certain corners are considered part of the racing surface. Please use caution when driving on road courses. In the heat of competition, it's very easy to forget that you're also placing three or four tires off of the track. A driver who consistently violates the two-tire rule to gain an unfair advantage will risk significant penalties and an adjusted finishing position.

III-C 5. Drivers may not pass cars by leaving the track and diving onto the apron. However, a competitor who completes a pass on the apron and then recognizes the mistake may return the track position gained without suffering any penalty after the race.

D. Forgiving Penalties

III-D 1. The league has a forgiveness system which enables drivers to forgive other competitors for committing a penalty. Generally, you must be involved in an incident with another driver to issue a forgiveness to that driver. For example, you cannot forgive a driver for a random pit road violation. You may, however, forgive a driver for causing an accident in which you were involved.

III-D 2. In order to issue a forgiveness, a driver must submit a private message to the league administrators. You can contact the administrators either before or after the final race results have been posted on the website. If you issue a forgiveness before, please describe the incident and identify the lap of the race. If you issue it afterwards, please identify the penalty and the lap of the race.

III-D 3. The league administrators have final approval over each forgiveness. We're unlikely to accept a forgiveness for an intentional crash or any other particularly serious offense. If we accept a forgiveness, then the points deduction for the driver in question will be reduced to 0. If your private message is confusing or unclear, we may not accept it as a valid forgiveness.

Here are a couple examples of an acceptable forgiveness message:

I would like to forgive Bob for the "dangeroud driving" infraction he received on lap 58 of the CUP race at Texas.
On lap 71 in NBS, Bob and I crashed in turn 3. If Bob is to blame for this incident, I would like to forgive him for it.

III-D 4. A forgiveness must be made within one week after the final race results have been posted on the website. In a multi-car crash, all drivers involved in the incident must forgive the perpetrator for the league administrators to accept a forgiveness.

IV. Championship Format

A. Season Standings

IV-A 1. The NASCAR Heat Racing League compiles the championship standings for each series based on total points accumulated throughout a season. After the final race of the season, the league member with the most points earns the series championship.

IV-A 2. If multiple drivers finish tied in points for a season, then the following tie-breaking criteria will determine their positions in the championship standings. The league administrators will proceed down this list until all ties are broken:

a. fewest number of scored races
b. greatest total of race victories
c. greatest total of top-5 finishes
d. greatest total of top-10 finishes
e. best average finishing position

IV-A 3. In our standard championship format, the worst finishes of every driver are dropped in progressive segments of 4 races throughout a season. After a driver is scored for 4 races, his lowest point total from an event is dropped and not counted in the championship standings. After 8 races, the lowest 2 point totals are then dropped from the standings. After 12 races, the lowest 3 point totals are dropped. After 16 races, the lowest 4 point totals are dropped. After 20 races, the lowest 5 point totals are dropped. This system enables drivers to miss an occasional race and remain competitive in the championship standings.

IV-A 4. Your lowest point totals will more than likely shift throughout a season. A mediocre 15th-place finish in the opening race, for example, may not remain among your lowest point totals at the end of the season. Additionally, all "Did Not Start" and "Did Not Race" finishes are also eligible to be dropped. Therefore, you should remember to notify the league administrators when you expect to miss a race. A driver who misses a race without notification is not scored, forfeiting a potential point total that could have been dropped.

IV-A 5. Occasionally, the NASCAR Heat Racing League may use alternative standings systems in series with shorter schedules. The standard system in these series will be a cumulative points race for the championship. The league administators will announce when a special system will be implemented for a particular series.

B. Bonus Points

Drivers can earn 5 bonus points for leading one lap, leading the most laps, starting in the pole position without leading one lap, and capturing the Hard Charger or Die Hard awards in a race. Drivers are recognized but do not earn bonus points for starting in the pole position while leading one lap or capturing the Move of the Race or Headache awards. Substitute drivers can earn 5 bonus points for leading one lap and leading the most laps but are not eligible to capture the Hard Charger or Die Hard awards.

Pole Position: The fastest driver in time trials captures the pole position. If the driver does not lead one lap during the race, then he receives 5 bonus points for capturing the pole. If the driver leads one lap during the race, then he does not receive bonus points for capturing the pole. Substitute drivers cannot participate in time trials and therefore are not eligible for the pole position.

Lead One Lap: Drivers who lead at least one lap during a race receive 5 bonus points. A driver can earn 5 additional bonus points for leading the most laps in the race.

Lead the Most Laps: The driver who leads the most laps during the race receives 5 bonus points. If two (or more) drivers are tied for leading the most laps then each will receive 5 bonus points. A driver who achieves this feat collects 10 total bonus points because he satisfies the requirement for leading one lap.

Move of the Race: The driver who is determined to have executed the best maneuver during a race captures the Move of the Race. A driver does not earn bonus points for capturing the Move of the Race but the distinction ranks among the most prestigious prizes.

Hard Charger Award: The driver who gains the most positions during the race captures the Hard Charger Award. A driver who struggles in time trials but battles back to a strong finish is a good candidate for this award. For the purpose of the Hard Charger Award, two or more drivers who skip qualifying and take a provisional are automatically considered to be starting from the same position on the grid. In addition, a driver cannot "triple up" by leading one lap, leading the most laps, and finally, also winning this award. In such scenarios the award will go to the next eligible driver in the race. Start-in-the-back and substitute drivers are also ineligible for the Hard Charger Award.

Die Hard Award: If a driver struggles during a race, then he may find some consolation by capturing the Die Hard Award. The worst-finishing driver who: a) gains at least one position from the starting grid, or b) maintains his position or loses the fewest positions if no drivers in the race have gained at least one position, and c) stays running during the entire race earns the Die Hard Award. Similar to the Hard Charger Award, drivers who lead the most laps and or face a "triple bonus" scenario cannot win this award. In such scenarios, the Die Hard award will go to the next eligible driver in the race. Start-in-the-back and substitute drivers are also ineligible for the Die Hard Award.

Headache Award: Although it's not Pearl Harbor all over again, it's almost always a day of infamy whenever a driver captures the Headache Award. The driver who loses the most positions from the starting grid during a race earns this dubious distinction.

C. Missing Races

IV-C 1. If you want to receive points when you're going to miss a race, then you must inform the league administrators about your upcoming absence. If a driver properly notifies the administrators ahead of time, then he will be scored as "Did Not Race" in the appropriate race results. A league member who does not inform the administrators about an absence will not receive points.

IV-C 2. Informing the league administrators about an absence is not difficult. League members can send a private message to the administrators or post a message on the forum. If you experience a sudden emergency that prevents you from notifying the administrators, then please contact them after the fact and explain what happened. We're usually very flexible in these situations.

IV-C 3. Occasionally, a driver comes to the league server intending to race, but experiences a technical glitch preventing him from competing in the event. In this situation, the driver will still receive points and be scored as "Did Not Start" in the corresponding race results. Competitors scored as "Did Not Start" in the results will rank ahead of competitors scored as "Did Not Race."

D. Substitute Drivers

IV-D 1. League members may ask a substitute driver to take their place when they would otherwise miss an event. If your substitute driver is not already a league member, then you should make sure that he reads and understands the rules page. If necessary, the league administrators may prevent an inexperienced or unprepared substitute driver from competing in a race.

IV-D 2. Substitute drivers may not participate in time trials. Instead, they must use a provisional and start at the rear of the field. A substitute driver who ignores this guideline automatically accrues a 10-point penalty for the regular driver.

IV-D 3. Substitute drivers must use the same car numbers as their regular drivers. A substitute driver who comes to a race using a different car number automatically accrues a 10-point penalty for the regular driver.

IV-D 4. During the 12-race regular season, league members are limited to 3 substitute drivers per series. The league administrators will announce special rules for series with shorter schedules. We may grant exceptions to this limit, but only in unique circumstances.

IV-D 5. Where can you find a decent substitute driver? An excellent place is right in the NASCAR Heat Racing League! Drivers in other series are always the most trustworthy choices. We've even provided a section in the forum specifically about searching for substitute drivers. We're confident everyone can find an adequate substitute driver given the number of members in the league.

V. Pit Road Procedures

A. General Pitting Rules

V-A 1. Every driver should understand the proper procedures for entering and exiting pit road. Please read through this section to understand the process for each course. Occasionally, the league administrators may also post tutorials on the forum.

V-A 2. If you have enough room, then you should always keep to the outside lane when cruising down pit road. On oval tracks, this is the furthest lane to the right from the pit stalls. On road courses, this can either be the furthest lane to the left or right from the pit stalls.

V-A 3. If two drivers are side by side on pit road, then they may remain alongside one another as long as they follow the proper procedures. In this situation, both drivers share a responsibility to leave enough space for other cars between themselves and the pit stalls. The inner driver does not have to be entirely in the outside lane, but he should be positioned as close to it as possible.

V-A 4. Do not needlessly cut through other stalls when entering or exiting your own pit box. The league administrators recognize that completely avoiding the stalls immediately in front of and behind your pit box can be challenging and that heavy traffic, awkward positioning, and incoming cars frequently add further complication to the pitting process. As a result, a driver is permitted reasonable leniency given the situation. In the majority of cases, a competitor should never have to cut through more than three stalls in order to enter or exit their pit box. Driver who attempt to gain an unfair advantage by cutting through multiple pit stalls can expect penalties.

V-A 5. At times, pit road can seem complicated and frantic, creating a challenging decision-making process. As a general rule, a driver should always try to avoid colliding with or damaging other cars on pit road with thoughtless moves. When exiting your pit box, for example, you should always check your rearview camera (F4) for incoming cars before returning to the outside lane. Pitting does not have to be complicated. Most of the time, patience and simple track awareness can prevent a lot of trouble.

B. Pitting on Advanced Speedways

Entering Pit Road: There are actually no entrance aprons on advanced speedways. When preparing to pit, drivers should signal their intentions, move to the left-most lane in turn 3, and decelerate on the pavement leading to pit road after clearing turn 4. Please demonstrate caution and avoiding hitting others from behind. Cars will be traveling at high speeds near the entrance to pit road.

Exiting Pit Road: At Brickyard, drivers use the exit lane to reach the back straight, checking for incoming cars and remaining in the left-most lane until reaching turn 4. MP Pocono, however, has no exit lane. When exiting, drivers must merge directly onto the racing surface, check for incoming cars, and remain to the left until reaching turn 2. Please do not jump into the middle of the track.

C. Pitting on Intermediate Speedways

Entering Pit Road: When preparing to pit, drivers should signal their intentions, move to the left-most lane, and enter the apron before reaching turn 3. Drivers must maintain safe speeds on the apron and avoid sliding back onto the racing surface. As you approach the entrance to pit road, you should decelerate at a gradual pace. Please do not slam on the brakes at the last moment.

Exiting Pit Road: When exiting pit road, drivers remain on the apron through turns 1 and 2 and merge onto the back straight. After merging, drivers must remain in the left-most lane until reaching turn 4. Please note: at Las Vegas and Miami, drivers leave pit road through the exit ramp. Do not attempt to leave the ramp and cut across the grass in order to reach the racing surface.

D. Pitting on Road Courses

Entering Pit Road: There should be nothing confusing about pitting on road courses. When preparing to pit, drivers must signal their intentions, move to the appropriate side of the track, and safely decelerate towards the entrance to pit road. Please note: at IndyRC T, drivers must enter the apron from the NASCAR oval in turn 2. Please click here to see a screenshot of the apron entrance at IndyRC T.

Exiting Pit Road: When exiting pit road, drivers must merge directly onto the track. However, please demonstrate caution, check for incoming cars, and remain on the same side of the track as the exit to pit road. Please do not swing into the middle racing groove. You should only move to the middle when you have reached the first turn following the exit to pit road.

E. Pitting on Short Tracks

Entering Pit Road: Bristol, IRP, MP Memphis, and Richmond each have entrance aprons. At these tracks, drivers should signal their intentions, move to the left-most lane, and enter the apron before reaching turn 3. Drivers must maintain safe speeds on the apron and avoid sliding back onto the racing surface. Martinsville and nwilkesboro n do not have entrance aprons. At these tracks, drivers should signal their intentions, move to the left-most lane in turn 2, and decelerate on the pavement leading to pit road.

Exiting Pit Road: At each track except Martinsville, drivers should remain on the apron through turns 1 and 2 and merge onto the back straight. After merging, drivers should check for incoming cars and remain in the left-most lane until reaching turn 4. At Martinsville, drivers should merge directly onto the racing surface, check for incoming cars, and remain in the left-most lane until reaching turn 4. Please do not jump into the middle of the track because someone is bound to be coming from behind.

F. Pitting on Super Speedways

Entering Pit Road: Drivers are not required to use the aprons at super speedways. When preparing to pit, drivers should signal their intentions, move to the left-most lane in turn 3, and decelerate on the pavement leading to pit road after clearing turn 4. Please demonstrate caution and avoiding hitting others from behind. Cars will be traveling at high speeds near the entrance to pit road.

Exiting Pit Road: When exiting pit road, drivers should merge directly onto the racing surface. After merging, drivers must remain alongside the apron line through turns 1, 2, and the entire back straight. Drivers who dart into the middle of the track attempting to complete some ill-conceived maneuver will be subject to league discipline. If you swing to the right, then you can expect a penalty.

VI. Caution Flag Rules

A. Caution Flags 101

VI-A 1. Starting in 2015, the league will implement caution flags in all official, points-awarding championship races. Jes Rathbun, caution flag innovator and Hardcore Motorsports administrator, will serve as the league's pace car driver and caution flag official.

VI-A 2. In the event that Jes Rathbun, the league's pace car driver and caution flag official, is unable to officiate a caution flag race, the league administrators may elect to replace him or simply suspend the use of caution flags for that particular race.

VI-A 3. Our caution flag rules are similar to those used in NASCAR and other pro racing series. The key difference between NHRL and NASCAR is that we only do single-file restarts. Additionally, laps-down drivers can line up at any position in the pace line prior to restarts.

VI-A 4. All drivers are required to be logged onto the league's Ventrilo server during caution flag races. Although we encourage it, you do not need to use a microphone while on Ventrilo, you just need to be able to hear the caution flag instructions throughout the race.

VI-A 5. The caution flag official is in charge of all caution flag instructions during races. Drivers are required to follow all instructions from the caution flag official without engaging in arguments or on-track disruptions. Drivers who do so will be subject to penalties.

VI-A 6. During league races, drivers can communicate with the caution flag official to get clarification on instructions, draw his attention to on-track incidents, or offer opinions - if requested. Drivers who mislead or manipulate the caution flag official will be subject to penalties.

B. Caution Flag Procedures

VI-B 1. The caution flag official will communicate with drivers by typing announcements via the NASCAR Heat chat interface. Messages will appear in the bottom center of the screen. He will also frequently communicate caution flag instructions verbally on Ventrilo. Please be aware at all times and pay attention to every caution flag instruction. Drivers who fail to do so will be subject to penalties.

VI-B 2. If the caution flag official issues a yellow flag, then the field and leaderboard immediately become frozen. Drivers should slow to a safe speed and file in line behind the pace car driver and the leader of the race. Passing on the track is prohibited until the green flag resumes after the restart. The pace speed at each track will be the same as the pit road speed. As a general rule, drivers should keep a distance of half of a second between themselves and the driver in front of them (the gap should read "0.5" on the leaderboard).

VI-B 3. Under caution, both lead-lap and laps-down drivers can enter pit road together. The caution flag official will announce when pit road is open or closed. Drivers who enter a closed pit road will be required to go to the tail of the pace line prior to the restart, unless the caution flag official instructs otherwise. After pitting, drivers should look ahead and drive at a safe speed to reach the tail of the pace line.

VI-B 4. All normal pit road procedures remain in effect under caution. We recommend applying an extra level of prudence and awareness when making pit stops during yellow flags. Compared to green flag pit stops, drivers are typically bunched much more closely together during caution flags. As you are leaving your pit stall, for example, you should be very aware of incoming drivers on pit road.

VI-B 5. Each caution, the highest-placed driver one lap down or more - at the time of the flag - will receive a "free pass" lap back from the field. Usually, drivers will receive their free pass by passing the pace car on the final yellow flag lap before the restart. The caution flag official will communicate the proper instructions to follow. Please be careful when circling around the track to receive a lap back. It is the driver's responsibility to circle around the track and reach the tail of the pace line safely and without jumping the restart.

VI-B 6. Additionally, under caution, other drivers who are laps down can potentially receive a "wave around" lap back from the field. This situation can only occur when one or more laps-down drivers elect not to make a pit stop under caution and subsequently end up in front of the leader prior to the restart. Most of the time, wave around drivers who receive a lap back will follow the same, circling-around procedure as a free pass driver. Before the restart, however, all wave around drivers must line up behind the free pass driver.

C. Caution Flag Policies

VI-C 1. The caution flag official will not issue cautions during the final 10% of a race. As a result, no league race that has caution flags can finish under caution (barring a server crash or other unforeseen circumstance). In a 100-lap race, for instance, that means cautions cannot occur between laps 91 and 100. The math is the following: [last possible caution flag] = [laps in race] - [[laps in race] x 10%].

VI-C 2. Use common sense when it comes to cautions. Like other procedures, caution flags do not have to be complicated. Listen to the caution flag official and feel free to ask questions when in doubt. Please keep chatter on Ventrilo at a sensible level during cautions. A little discussion is fine, at appropriate moments, but there is a threshold after which things can get confusing. Disruptive drivers who interfere with the communication of the caution flag official or the general proceedings of the race will be subject to penalties.

VI-C 3. During yellow flag races, in general, a certain degree of trust, give-and-take, and responsibility is required. The purpose of caution flags is not to create confusion or opportunities for gamesmanship, but rather promote close competition and exciting races. Please always remember the principles involved in caution flags and act accordingly. Remember, when in doubt, ask the caution flag official!

VI-C 4. A restart, or the return to green flag racing after a caution flag, is a pivotal moment of the race. As a restart approaches, the pace car driver will leave the pace line and head to pit road. At this point, the leader of the race becomes the setter of the pace speed, which remains the pit road speed. Every driver should be squarely in line. The official will then type a message like "green flag" to alert you that green flag racing has resumed. Do not attempt to jump the restart or pass drivers before reaching the start/finish line.

VI-C 5. Under caution, multiple drivers are often entering the pits at the same time, leading to tight races coming off of pit road. When two drivers leave pit road, and it's really close, it may not be obvious whom should be in front of whom. This situation is a good example of give-and-take. We don't have access to instant replay during the race, so your wise and sound judgement is required.

VI-C 6. Be aware and careful under caution. Sometimes, drivers will be passing the pace line at a higher speed than the pace speed, for example, to receive a free pass or wave around lap back from the field. From time to time, the caution flag official may extend the current caution flag period by an extra lap or two. One reason for doing so might be to better organize the pace line. And, although he drives in a funny-looking car, under no circumstances should you ever strike the pace car driver, unless of course, he clearly deserves it.